2017 CCFSA Conference

Plan to attend the 2018 CCFSA National Conference.

It will be in Bowling Green, KY. April 15-18, 2018.

Archive for the ‘Articles by Harold Shank’ Category

Hosea – A Book About Hurting Children Part 5

Saturday, July 9th, 2011

Part V: Abandoned Children and Attachment Disorders It was an international adoption. The abandoned boy came to the attention of a single parent in a neighboring nation. The paperwork was the easy part. The problems started when the youngster seemed unable to respond to the tenderness of his adopted father. He taught him to walk,[…..]

Hosea – A Book About Hurting Children Part 4

Saturday, July 9th, 2011

Part IV: A Forgotten God Remembers God said it. He was talking about the Israel of the eighth century B.C. They lived in Samaria and Bethel and Gilgal. It’s a line so brief, most people likely miss it. Three words that give a glimpse into God’s heart. What did God say? “They forgot me” (Hosea[…..]

Hosea – A Book About Hurting Children Part 3

Saturday, July 9th, 2011

Part III: A Terrible Prayer Hosea started to pray, and then stopped. “Give them, O LORD—.” What he wanted to ask was so horrible. His prayer (Hosea 9:14) seemed so unacceptable. How could he ask God to do what he was about to ask? “Give them a miscarrying womb and dry breasts.” There he prayed[…..]

Hosea – A Book About Hurting Children Part 2

Saturday, July 9th, 2011

Part II: It’s Got You Written All Over It She hated her name. When she was little, she didn’t understand. But when she learned the whole story, her name became a burden. Some think it has a pretty sound: Lo-Ruhamah, accent on the last syllable. Children often dislike the names their parents give them, but[…..]

Hosea – A Book About Hurting Children – Part 1

Saturday, July 9th, 2011

Bible Study About Children Hosea—A Book About Hurting Children Part I: Hosea–A Biblical Book for Child Care Workers! Hosea is a seldom-read, fourteen-chapter Minor Prophet that remains a remarkably relevant book. Those who work with hurting children will find the painful images and harsh descriptions all too familiar. Contemporary foster parents, today’s case workers, and[…..]

Reasons to Be Involved in Child Care Part IV: by Harold Shank

Thursday, April 28th, 2011

Sons and Daughters of God Central to our identity as Christians is our claiim to be children of God. He is our Father. We become his daughters. We are reborn as his sons. Yet none of us have a direct bilological link to God. The New Testament makes it clear that our claim to be[…..]

Healing the Wounded Father – The Contemporary Fathering Crisis by Harold Shank

Tuesday, August 24th, 2010

Healing the Wounded Father – The Contemporary Fathering Crisis The Wounded Father In his book Finding Our Fathers, psychologist Samuel Osherson tells about a forty-two-year-old doctor who came to him with a problem. His younger brother’s wedding had brought the entire family, including their divorced parents, together in St. Louis. The physician spent most of[…..]

Reasons To Be Involved In Child Care: Part 1 by Harold Shank

Saturday, September 19th, 2009

      Part 1: Fathers in the Bible The word “father” appears in the Bible over 1,500 times. Most Christians could name dozens of biblical fathers and sons, from Adam and his sons, Cain and Abel, to Zebedee and his sons, James and John. We could cite several father and daughter relationships, including the[…..]

Reasons To Be Involved In Child Care: Part 2 by Harold Shank

Saturday, September 19th, 2009

    Part 2: God as Father God as Father is well known to most Christians. In the New Testament, God is called father of our Lord Jesus Christ (Rom 15:6 and several other texts), father of mercies and all comfort (2 Cor 1:3) and father of glory (Eph 1:17). God is also father of[…..]

Reasons To Be Involved In Child Care: Part 3 by Harold Shank

Saturday, September 19th, 2009

  Part 3: God as Father of the Fatherless The Bible calls God the father of the fatherless (Psalm 68:5). About forty times, the Old Testament describes orphaned children as fatherless. Perhaps they were called fatherless because the high casualty rates in the numerous Old Testament wars left them with mothers, but no fathers. Orphans[…..]